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10 One-Minute Comedic Female Monologues

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

July 11, 2017

Looking for that elusive one-minute comedic monologue from a female character? We’ve got ten from our collection of ever-growing monologues that are perfect for competitions and auditions. What are you waiting for? Check them out below!

A monologue from Jupiter by Gary Briston

(Female, Comedic, Teens)
Alice Altoona, 16; a charming, life-loving creature of unfortunate and untimely experience with no convictions whatsoever explains what happened after Joe scared Mimi with his talk about the sky.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Piñata Utopia by Christian Kiley

(Female, Comedic, Juniors – Teens)
A young girl stops the guests at her birthday party from hitting Princess Piñata by delivering this speech, which has a touch of Braveheart in it.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from White Suits in Summer by Rosary O’Neill

(Female, Comedic, 20s – 40s)
This contemporary romantic comedy exposes life in the topsy-turvy world of art in New Orleans. Celebrity artist Susanne determines to reclaim her lost love, Blaise, now married to a sedate New Orleans socialite. Convinced that without him she cannot live, Susanne arranges an exhibition of her works in his new house on Exposition Blvd. Susanne’s readiness to sacrifice her career, his new wife, and her Mama’s boy manager leave Blaise both angry and aroused. Theatrical excitement abounds in this comedy of love vs. duty in which passions are rediscovered in the Big Easy. Susanne defends her drunk behavior to her manager.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Cougar by Holli Harms

(Female, Comedic, 30s – 50s)
Kate has entered this bar in hopes of seeing her old college boyfriend. Instead she meets his son, Jose. His father has died and so Jose’ has gone looking for Kate, his father’s one regret in life. The son reads all of his dad’s poems about Kate. His dad tells him to find a woman like Kate and don’t make the mistake he did by letting her go. The son decides not to find someone “like” but to find Kate herself. He meets her at the bar to exclaim his love for her. He is in his 20’s and she in her 50’’s. A woman at the bar – drunk and also of a “certain age”  tells Kate that this is ridiculous and that she will look ridiculous with this young man. She goes on and on and Kate realizes she is jealous of her. Jealous of this boy and his attention and so below is Kate’s answer to the woman.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Snowflakes by Debbie Lamedman

(Female or Male, Comedic, Teens – 20s)
Taylor is one of the subjects for the documentary. Taylor enters with a stack of books, stuffed animals, toys of some sort. Taylor doesn’t stop rearranging them as they speak to Suzanna. Taylor continues focusing on the items throughout the entire scene. Taylor is very animated, but makes little to no eye contact with Suzanna.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Yearbook by Steven Fendrich

(Female, Comedic, Teens)
Susan is the editor of the Springdale High School yearbook. To complete the yearbook, she needs Cathy to go down and take some pictures of “Jock Block.” But “Jock Block” is the hallway where the most popular jocks and cheerleaders gather, and Cathy is scared to go alone. In fact, she is so scared she has a nightmare in which Susan orders Cathy to go… or else! This is what Nightmare Susan has to say.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Grover by Joel Fishbane

(Female, Comedic, 20s – 40s)
Wife has kicked out Husband, who’s crushed and now living with his older sister, Jess. Husband is shocked to learn online that Wife has gotten a dog, considering their mutual hatred for dogs is what brought them together. Jess wants Husband to stop worrying and obsessing over Wife and her new dog. She tries to encourage Husband to move on and trust that not all females are as crazy as Wife.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Most Important American Playwright Since Tennessee Williams by William Shuman

(Female, Comedic, 30s – 40s)
Willy is a playwright who drives a taxicab to pay the bills. His biggest inspiration is the playwright A. Richard Cutter. One day, Cutter stops by Willy’s apartment to respond in person to the fan letter Willy sent eight years prior. Cutter is now broke and tries to get free housing out of Willy in exchange for teaching and mentoring. Angie, Willy’s girlfriend, is in support of this deal. She is tired of seeing Willy drive the taxi instead of seeing him live his dreams. Angie calls Willy out on being too passive about his dreams.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Cindy Variations by Evan Guilford-Blake

(Female, Comedic, Teens – 20s)
This monologue comes at the end of the play as Cindy reflects on her growth throughout the play as both an actress and an individual. She realizes she’s found someone who honestly loves her and that she’s satisfied with the life — and Patterson, the fiancé — she has that truly makes her happy.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Most Important American Playwright Since Tennessee Williams by William Shuman

(Female, Comedic, 30s – 40s)
Willy is a playwright who drives a taxicab to pay the bills. His girlfriend, Angie, is a struggling actress and recovering alcoholic/heroin addict. She and Willy have been together for 4 years. On her way out to her acting class, Willy asks her what she’ll be performing. She tells him she’ll be doing a piece called the “Lasagna Monologue” he’s written. He has serious qualms about its current quality, as he hasn’t completely finished yet, but Angie seems to like it and delivers it here to show him that it’s got at least some merit.

Get the monologue here.



Looking for other monologue collections? Check out the ones below!


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.