10 Great Monologues from LGBTQ-Identifying Characters

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

October 11, 2016

Looking for a monologue from an LGBTQ identifying character? We’re here to help. Below we’ve listed ten monologues from our collection that feature LGBTQ characters dealing with acceptance, relationships, transitioning, and personal discovery.

A monologue from Women of Choice by David Rush

(Female, Serio-comic, 20s – 30s)
This standalone monologue is entitled “ARTIE, the Single Girl.” Artie is by herself at a mixer (a party for single people looking to meet other single or available people) for the gay community. She has just sat down to talk to another woman she is interested in and expresses her discomfort over attending these kinds of functions. Her awkward small talk quickly devolves into a very personal account of why she has socially awkward tendencies and social anxiety. They seem to stem from her young adult relationship with her parents; her awkward feelings and comments are spilling over into her interactions with others, especially in romantic situations. As she speaks, she also brings up two of her ex-es, which only adds more discomfort to the situation. (This monologue contains adult language.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Nobody by Crystal Skillman

(Female, Dramatic, College – 20s)
Kat is a proofreader, sitting at a restaurant alone, working. She recounts to the audience the time she was the maid of honor at her good friend Anna’s wedding. This leads into a brief account of the nature of their relationship, and a secret they share together. Kat and Anne have been lovers since they met during college and Kat is still attempting to come to terms with exactly how she feels about the nature of their relationship. A strong, understated dramatic monologue.

Get the monologue here.

Coming Out by Cullen Douglas

(Female, Serio-comic, Teens – 20s)
In this standalone monologue, Michelle, late teens early 20’s, is at her first support group meeting. She’s a nervous wreck, talking a mile a minute, except for when she suddenly stops for a beat and stares, like she’s looking at animals in a zoo. Michelle is gay. Proud. But scared to come out to her parents about it. She’s looking for advice, back up, a plan. But she won’t stop rambling on and on long enough for anyone to get a word in edgewise.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Nobody by Crystal Skillman

(Female, Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
A
nna, a poet trapped in a loveless marriage, recounts her situation to the audience. Constantly dreaming of her long time friend and occasional lover Kat, she explains how she called in sick from work today and has been wandering around the city, reading and trying to sort out her feelings. She finally decides that she needs to contact Kat and explain how deep her feelings for her truly are.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Women of Choice by David Rush

(Male-to-Female transitioning, Dramatic, 20s – 50s)
This standalone monologue is entitled “MARCIA, the Diver.” Marcia is a transgender male-to-female woman who has saved almost enough money of her goal ($35,000) to complete her gender reassignment surgery. However, she has been in a relationship with a man who keeps pushing her to have sex with him. She is stuck in a situation where she must choose to either get a back-alley surgery (a very risky procedure, as it may be a scam or end in death) or tell her boyfriend the truth (another equally risky choice that may result in Marcia being physically injured by her boyfriend). Here, she visits a website for the transgender community and posts on their message board, asking their advice and weighing her options.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Porch by Alex Kump

(Male, Dramatic, 20s)
In this scene Jeff describes to Vincent about when he knew he was in love with him. He talks about the miraculous and mystifying physical sensation of being in love with someone, and then talks about how one is definitely, positively, undoubtedly sure when they’ve fallen in love.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Wild by Crystal Skillman

(Male, Dramatic, 20s – 40s)
The shore of a beach during early afternoon. Vin, a stranger Peter has never met before today, is sitting on his towel on the beach. Vin is a grad student at Northwestern, and Peter is the Junior Client Reporting Associate at Mesirow Financial. Peter’s father is dying, and his family does not accept that Peter is gay. His family passive-aggressively blames Peter for his father being in the hospital. In addition, Peter has been unfaithful to Bobby, his partner, and slept with a woman. Peter is struggling with low self worth and venting to Vin, who is willingly listening to Peter’s troubles.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Better Places to Go by David-Matthew Barnes

(Male, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Harboring feelings of love for his male best friend, Derek is suicidal and manic. He’s eighteen and misunderstood. At a rundown truck stop diner in Grand Island, Nebraska, he tells Ricardo why they need to leave town together.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Days Are as Grass by Carol Hall

(Male, Dramatic, 30s – 40s)
A man and a woman, two former lovers and old friends, are reuniting after twenty years. They share a tremendous love of reading and their conversation is colored with a dry, sardonic humor and intelligence. The woman has revealed that the reason for their meeting is so she can ask why he left her so many years ago. He avoids the question, and returns to her very first question of the evening, “Are you happy?” From this answer he reveals that he has been destroyed by loneliness after the love of his life, a man, left him for a twenty-three year old.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from In Close Quarters by Michael Wanzie

(Male, Dramatic, College – 20s)
Vietnam. Soldiers Ivey and Dolan are alone in a small bunker, and Dolan has just come out to Ivey as gay. Ivey is irate and thinks that Dolan has lied to him about his sexuality in order to get physically close to him. Dolan explains that the picture he carries with his gear is his friend, a lover he had during college before the war. The man in the picture asked Dolan to run away with him the night of the draft. Though it is not revealed in this monologue, it is important to know that after Dolan tells his friend he will not leave with him, his friend commits suicide.

Get the monologue here.


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.