10 Monologues from Male Characters: Fathers, Brothers, and Sons

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

November 7, 2016

Gentlemen, are you looking for a monologue from a character who holds the familial title of “father”, “brother”, or “son”? We’ve got 10 monologues from male characters who are trying desperately to either connect with family members or come to terms with who they are as fathers, brothers, or sons.

A monologue from San Francisco Scarecrows by Kevin Lōttes

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Driving from the Midwest, Ozzie travels with his friend Hopper to San Francisco to search for Ozzie’s estranged father. Ozzie finds his father and is set to meet him. Ozzie leaves Hopper at the hotel room while he goes to meet his father for the first time.  When Ozzie returns to the hotel room without his father, he explains to his friend what happened — his father didn’t recognize him.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Sex & Death in London by Crystal Skillman

(Dramatic, Teens)
London. A pub in Clapham Junction. Outside, the London riots are raging. Two teenage girls, Tink and Cyn, have broken into the pub and are waiting on their friend, Terra. Henry is the father of Terra, who has gone missing amid the riots. He has snooped on Terra’s open laptop at home and discovered Terra’s plans to escape to the pub with Tink and Cyn. ALEX, Terra’s 16 year-old boyfriend, has just come into the bar with food and drink. He encounters Henry, who keeps asking where Terra is, but Alex won’t tell him. Instead, Alex expounds on the riots outside and mocks Henry’s lack of education. Alex tells Henry that he has plans for Terra and their unborn child to live a happy life, but Terra is terrified of ending up like her father: an uneducated parent.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Sunken Living Room by David Caudle

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Chip’s girlfriend Tammy has just apologized for breaking a very expensive ashtray and is helping Wade, Chip’s younger brother, clean up the mess. She gives him a hard time for being so well-behaved, but she still treats him with more kindness than his parents or his brother do. In this monologue, Wade tells Tammy his favorite memory of his older sister Allison before she ran away, and reveals that Tammy is the first person to show him any respect or kindness since Allison’s departure.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Sunken Living Room by David Caudle

(Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Chip’s father recently paid for Tammy’s abortion, and in a phone call told his son that he should never be a father. Chip, high on cocaine and insulted by his father’s hypocrisy, has decided to leave home after this phone call and has ransacked and destroyed the house looking for money. Wade, Chip’s younger brother, has hidden Chip’s car keys during this destructive episode because Chip is entirely unfit to drive, and Chip reacts by choking him. At the last moment, he releases his grip on his brother and gives this cathartic monologue where he defends his right to be a father, and insists he would be a much better father than his own. (This monologue contains adult language.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Jet Boy Jet Girl by Alex Kump

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
In this scene Jacob visits his father’s gravestone and talks to him about his new sexual relationship with Shane, a guy who uses him only for sex. Jacob doesn’t know whether or not his father would have approved of his new relationship, but he knows his father would have listened. His trust in his father’s patience and compassion reveals a strong father-son bond in the face of uncertainty, even if Jacob’s father is dead. (This monologue contains sexual situations.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from 4 Edges by Crystal Skillman

(Dramatic, 20s – 40s)
Deep in the wooded mountains of an unrecognizable foreign country. A fire crackles in a small pit. The people of this community have an intense spiritual connection with nature, their ancestors, and each other, reaching so far as to include telepathy with the living and reincarnation. Terrins, a member of the village where Palmer is visiting for her photo project, delivers this monologue to Palmer in the midst of telling her that he and his young wife, Loxy, cannot have children; they need a surrogate. Palmer is aghast at the prospect, having been pregnant before and gotten an abortion. But Loxy sees something in Palmer, and Terrins persuades Palmer to give in to her innermost desires to have a child and put a piece of herself in the world. (What Terrins does not mention in this monologue, but he knows, is that after he and Palmer have had sex, he will cut his own throat, and his spirit will be born into the unborn child that will inhabit Palmer’s womb. This is the price Terrins must pay to have a child.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Cuban Spring by Vanessa Garcia

(Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Siomara is the American-born daughter of Cuban parents who married an American named John. Their marriage has been struggling since Siomara neglected to tell John she was pregnant because of her hesitations concerning his poor relationship with his family. She has a loving and close-knit family and feels that since he has abandoned his, that she may not trust him to be a father. In this monologue, John is confessing to her that he has reached out to find his mother, and brings her both good and bad news.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Burning the Old Man by Kelly McCallister

(Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Marty is telling Bobby the truth about a fight he was in when he visited his father in Alaska several years ago. In this monologue, he admits that his father gave him money to sleep with a prostitute after his father pointed a gun at another man. He’s embarrassed that he has to explain this part of his relationship with his father to Bobby. (This monologue contains explicit language and talk of sexual situations.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Memory Tax by Chad Eschman

(Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Jason confronts his father, who abandoned him and his mother when he was just a baby. He’s come to ask for money, so that he and his pregnant girlfriend can try for a fresh start in the ravaged, post-apocalyptic America that his father helped create.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Cowbirds by DT Arcieri

(Dramatic, 20s)
Tommy, 25, has two degrees and a serious fascination with birding (bird watching, listening, studying). He believes he was an accident because he was born 15 years after his sister. He feels that his Mother, whom he cares for because of her blindness, resents him for that reason and also because his father passed away the day he was born. Because he never knew his father, he imagines him as a gentle, more open parent and often takes time alone to talk his imaginary body. In this monologue, he is telling his father about his new fascination with blind cave animals. This new interest may have come about since learning that his mother’s blindness is familial and that he may inherit it. He expresses his need to go back to school for a P.h.D. so he can get a better job and care for his mother and sister, and then realizes that he can do none of this if he goes blind.

Get the monologue here.


Looking for other monologue collections? Check out the ones below!


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.