10 Greek and Roman Monologues for Men

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

October 25, 2016

Looking for a monologue from the classic Greeks and Romans? We’ve got ten male monologues that feature conflicted characters in situations that test wills, emotions, and ethics. (Looking for female monologues from the Greeks and Romans? We’ve got those, too.) Like a monologue? Find it for free on our site at the “Get the monologue here.” link after each item.

A monologue from Hecuba by Euripides

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
The shoreline of the ocean, Greece. Hecuba and her daughter, Polyxena, together with large numbers of Trojan women, are prisoners of war after the Greek’s victory at the first Great War between the east and west. Hecuba’s son, Polydorus, has been left with a friend for protection, but as we hear in his speech, that friend has murdered him for his knowledge of the money hidden by his father Priam. He speaks from the grave.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Antigone by Sophocles

(Dramatic, Teens – 40s)
The guard tells Creon that someone has dared to “bury” the body of someone who has been executed. He is out of breath, and begins to defend himself before he reveals his truth, lest he be executed for delivering the news. (In reality, Antigone has buried the body of her brother, a forbidden act.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Alcestis by Euripides

(Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Alcestis has offered to sacrifice her life in exchange for her husband’s. Admetus, Alcestis’s husband, realizes the loss that comes with his wife’s death. Admetus is horrified and angered that his aged parents, especially father Pheres, would not agree to sacrifice themselves instead. He is also sorrowful that Alcestis will soon be lost to him (though evidently not so sorrowful as to prevent it by allowing himself to die as the Fates ordained).

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Oedipus the King by Sophocles

(Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Upon speaking with his new wife, Jocasta (who he doesn’t know is his mother), Oedipus tells Jocasta about who he thinks he is based on what his adoptive parents told him. Oedipus was raised by a couple who told him that a prophecy had been told that said Oedipus would murder his father and marry his mother. Unknowing that his actual father and mother were Laius, the former king, and Jocasta, his current wife, Oedipus is burdened with what his future (and past) might hold. He postulates out loud to Jocasa, ignorant of the truth.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Wasps by Aristophanes

(Comedic, 20s – 50s)
A career politician getting ready for a debate boasts of his fame and wealth. He brags that everyone loves him and trusts him, and the people at the bar of the tribunal wait to speak with him. This man is full of himself, and he’s not afraid to insult other people for his own gain. The words he says are in earnest, but the fact that he’s saying them out loud are where the comedy lies.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Menaechmi by Plautus

(Comedic, Teens – 40s)
In a play similar to Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors, two brothers who have been separated at birth — who also bear the same name — find themselves in a mix-up. When Menaechmus Sosicles is unhappy with his wife, he berates her and threatens to cast her out of his house, causing her to return to her mother and father’s house. He’s unhappy with everything: dinner, her attitude, their life together. His constant complaining is only comedic in his tirade.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Hippolytus by Euripides

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Hippolytus, approached by Phaedra, expresses his disgust with Phaedra and the entire female gender. In the beginning of the play, Hippolytus tells Aphrodite that he will remain chaste and refuses to worship her. To exact revenge against him, Aphrodite casts a spell on Phaedra, Hippolytus’ stepmother, that makes Phaedra fall in love with and seduce Hippolytus.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Ion by Euripides

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Ion tells his story to the Queen of Athens. Ion, as a baby, was left to die in the woods by his mother. In this monologue, he tells the Queen of Athens about his origins and how much he appreciates her generous hospitality when he arrives at her court.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Antigone by Sophocles

(Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Haemon, Creon’s son, begs his father not to kill Antigone. Antigone has buried the body of her brother, Polynices, after a decree by Creon has made Polynices’ burial forbidden. Haemon, a loving cousin, is distraught that Creon would even think to have his niece executed.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Oedipus at Colonus by Sophocles

(Dramatic, 30s – 50s)
In a physical altercation in the court of Colonus, Creon, Oedipus’ brother-in-law, restrains former king Oedipus and Oedipus’ daughter, Antigone. Creon had ordered Oedipus to leave the city, but Oedipus refused. Creon orders his guards to capture Antigone and his own daughter, Ismene, who had fled to complete trials for Oedipus. After Theseus, the king, enters and stops the scuffle, Creon condemns Oedipus. Oedipus responds by lamenting over the horrors he’s committed — unwittingly killing his own father and marrying his own mother.

Get the monologue here.


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.