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10 One-Minute Dramatic Male Monologues

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

July 13, 2017

Hey, guys! Are you looking for a monologue that shows off your dramatic talents? We’ve got ten to choose from that we’ve taken from our collection. Dive in below!

A monologue from Darkpool by Don Nigro

(Male, Dramatic, 20s – 40s)
This scene takes place at the headquarters of Darkpool Associates, a vast, labyrinthine building somewhere outside Washington DC. An office with tables and chairs. Now that Dutch and Mick have told their sides of the story, all four characters meet up to finalize what they will tell the company and a jury (potentially). Dutch, mistrusting of Max and Justine, begins to act out. Mick angrily has left the room and Justine followed after him. Max, president of Darkpool Associates, tries to put Dutch back in line by telling him of the time he discovered God. Dutch retaliates and asks Max is he was sure it wasn’t the Devil. Here, Max responds.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Property by Rosary O’Neill

(Male, Dramatic, College – 20s)
Greed permeates this contemporary romantic comedy set in a Garden District mansion in New Orleans. A young man is caught between his dedication to his family’s past (and “property”) and his own very different future. Should he follow his heart and marry a New-Age nurse or succumb to his imperious society-driven mother Irene Dubonnet and drop her? The satire intensifies because it’s carnival in New Orleans when old and new traditions and masked traditions consume the family. Rooster, on his deathbed, is trying to paint.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Album by David Rimmer

(Male, Dramatic, Teens)
In David Rimmer’s Pulitzer-finalist comedy, Peggy, Trish, Billy and Boo grow up. The changes they go through are hilarious and universal. Billy, in high school in June of 1967.  He’s at The Quarry.  Billy tells his friends about a dream he has…and a wish.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Tales from the Red Rose Inn by Don Nigro

(Male, Dramatic, College – 30s)
James is speaking to Susannah Rose, a 17-year-old girl whom he won from her father in a game of dice. She despises him for this, and his changing stories of why he is here and why he killed a man. This is his final plea to gain her love, and he quite beautifully illustrates to her the love she deserves and how he will be the perfect man to have a life with.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from America by Kim Yaged

(Male, Dramatic, 20s)
America is a theater/dance hybrid that explores ethnicity, race, religion, and culture in the United States. Sound collage, music and movement complement the text as it undresses stereotypes and prejudices, creating a provocative social commentary that challenges us to examine our belief systems. In the United States of America, Black pushes a black block with the word “open-ended” on it in white letters onto the stage as a religious collage rises, borrowing from a variety of influences–call to prayer, gospel, responsive voices, hymns, chanting, singing, etc.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Vagabond by Ricardo Soltero-Brown

(Male, Dramatic, 20s)
Nate, who lives alone, has brought Shelley (Michelle), a homeless girl, home with him. He’s given her a place to stay, and he is, if not in love with her already, falling in love with her quickly. As he pours his heart out to her about the kind of person he is, she listens superficially, nodding and “Mhmm”ing to appease his need for response. But here, he genuinely needs her to listen. He explains that he’s still in the process of becoming who he has yet to be, and that end result can only be achieved with the right person by his side.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Grippe of October by John P. McEneny

(Male, Dramatic, Teens)
It starts with a cough. October 1918. Weary young soldiers return to their hometowns after the end of the fighting in Europe, bringing with them the scars of war…and a mysterious illness that spreads like wildfire. Clifford, pre-teens to early teens, has an intellectual disability. His mother is dying of the flu during the Spanish Flu pandemic after World War I.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Locker Next 2 Mine by Jonathan Dorf

(Male, Dramatic, Teens)
Legolas, a sensitive Goth teen, is in a classroom where they’ve just received the results of aptitude tests that they took earlier in the year.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Norman! by DT Arcieri

(Male, Dramatic, 20s)
Norman has sought out a variety of solutions to get a hold of his severe anxiety. After losing his wife and job he is willing to try anything. From conventional to new age he is on a journey to find a cure for his mental illness. At this point in the play, he has decided to talk to a Priest. At first Norman addresses the audience on a blank stage. As the monologue goes on the stage begins to take the form of a church and the Priest becomes more clear.

Get the monologue here.


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.