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10 New Dramatic Monologues for Young Adults

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

April 18, 2017

Are you searching for a powerful and strong dramatic monologue for your next audition? We’ve chosen ten top-notch monologues that pack a punch. Whether it’s a young woman trying to describe the elements of a perfect conversation or a paraplegic soldier proposing to his girlfriend, these monologues are sure to make you stand out.

A monologue from Full Code by David Valdes Greenwood

(Female, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Lauren worked closely with Sander in the hospital before his accident.  Having gotten exceptionally close during this time, Lauren is now finding herself upstaged by Sander’s wife, Callie, after he falls into a coma.  In this monologue, she is talking to Callie; it is optimist v. skeptic.  Lauren had helped Sander change his will from DNR to Full Code before the accident, and without it, he would not be living right now.  Lauren tells Callie a touching story of another patient in a coma—a hopeful ruse to see if she can soften Callie’s cold heart.  

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Salem’s Daughter By Craig Sodaro

(Female, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Every fall, Heather and her group of friends celebrate all of their birthdays at one communal party.  Feeling the power of all being seniors in high school, Heather thought it would be a great prank to invite the new girl in town, an outcast named Sarah, to their birthday soiree.  Sarah feels awkward and imposing, but Heather insists that she blow out the candles on their cake.  Heather wants all her friends to make wishes then share what they wished for.  In this monologue, she tells a story of her uncle who wondered “if it was wrong to wish for something bad to happen to somebody.”

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Conversation by Alexis Clements

(Female, Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
In this monologue, Katharine welcomes the audience into the lecture hall/small theatre where she is speaking.  She attempts to get started multiple times, getting interrupted by her own thoughts and missteps, all in a constant effort to describe the perfect conversation.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Rememberin’ Stuff by Eleanor Harder

(Female, Dramatic, Teens)
Maria remembers receiving a very special valentine from a boy named “Jos” in the fifth grade.  That year, their teacher had made everyone draw names to pick who they would make a card for. That valentine made her so happy; she thought it was the most beautiful one she had ever received.  She never knew if Jos liked her, and he moved soon after, but she still has his valentine to this very day.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Knock by Lauren Kettler

(Female, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Miranda is down from Tallahassee for the weekend with boyfriend Lem. When a despondent Lem apparently shoots himself, Miranda takes refuge in Joy’s room next door. Thus begins the unlikely bonding of two very different women, both in the throes of facing their respective fears. As the monologue begins, Miranda is still coming to terms with the evening’s shocking events.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Threnody by David-Matthew Barnes

(Male, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Jake is suffering from a horrible addiction to speed. Although he is an aspiring artist with considerable potential, his personal demons have held him back. He is in a volatile relationship with Dana, a former cheerleader who he feels guilty for corrupting. He remembers the first time they met. Dana is in another room. He hopes his words are reaching her.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Paralyzed July by Kevin Lottes

(Male, Dramatic, 20s – 30s)
Returning home in a wheelchair from an ongoing war, a young paraplegic soldier is faced with the patiently abiding love of his life. avowing to their own appetite for freedom, they struggle to recuperate their zeal and fervor for each other. Carl pops the big question in order to win back his indifferent girlfriend, who has been become distant since he returned from war a paraplegic.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Chatroom by Enda Walsh

(Male, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
An internet chatroom; in Jim’s room on his laptop. The play follows the conversations of six teenagers who meet and chat online. William and Jack have been discussing the merits of children’s literature, Emily and Eva, the pernicious influence of Britney Spears, Laura has been listening to Jim, who is depressed. Then William, Jack, Emily and Eva come together to form a chatroom they call ‘Chiswick’s Bloody Opinionated’. Jim joins the group late one night. He wants to talk about his depression. Emily is sympathetic to Jim, but when she tells the group about her own experience of anorexia, the others ridicule her, and she leaves the chatroom. William then asks for a private chat with Jack, leaving Jim alone with Eva. William is bored and is looking for ‘a cause’. As we are about to learn in the following scene, William’s plan is to toy with Jim, to ‘Mess him up a bit. See how far he’ll go’. He wants to encourage Jim to kill himself publicly as an act of solidarity with all forgotten teenagers. Eva is already having the same idea, and now that she is alone with Jim she plans to get him to talk. Jim’s speech comes in response to Eva’s: ‘So tell me about the day your father went missing.’

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Japes by Simon Gray

(Male, Dramatic, 20s)
The sitting room of their house in Hampstead, North London. Michael and Jason’s parents are dead. The young men have shared ownership of the house they grew up in and where they continue to live. Here, close to the start of the play, they have been discussing Michael’s girlfriend Anita. Michael has asked Jason whether he minds the fact that she has been staying the night. Michael admits that he himself does not like the smell of the pot that Anita smokes. The speech that follows comes as a response to Jason asking, ‘But you haven’t said anything to her have you?’

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Ladies Down Under by Amanda Whittington

(Male, Dramatic, Teens – 20s)
Surfer’s Paradise, Queensland, Australia. Ladies Down Under is the sequel to Ladies’ Day, in which four female fish-factory workers from Hull win a small fortune at the races. One and a half years on they have booked a holiday to Sydney, Australia. However, when Jan’s boyfriend Joe fails to  meet them at the airport they decide to change their plans and head further afield. Here on Queensland’s Gold Coast they meet Shane, who delivers the speech that follows.

Get the monologue here.



Looking for other monologue collections? Check out the ones below!


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.