“Dreams Do Come True, If Only We Wish Hard Enough.” Audition Monologues for Peter Pan

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

September 27, 2018

Auditioning for J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan soon? Check out these amazing monologues chosen specifically for every character.

Auditioning for Peter Pan


“Advice” by Douglas M. Parker
A kid talks about the advice he/she gives themselves… and how they never take it. Go to bed early, take a jacket, take your own advice! All of these are ignored by the kid. A good piece for a young actor who is working on developing prideful inner dialogue.

Get the monologue here

Occupational Hazards by Mark McCarthy
This monologue from Occupational Hazards is entitled “Columbass.” Elizabeth is whip-smart teenage girl who’s discovering that her teachers are not always right. She passionately argues for her version of history.

Get the monologue here

Auditioning for Wendy Darling


Operation Oddball by Lisa Bruna
The children return home, having gotten documentation for all three of their promised oddballs. Taking a bit of a victory lap and riding her sugar high, Lola gloats about their success and adventures to her elder sister. What the children don’t yet realize is that one of the photos necessary for the success did not take properly and may cost them their win.

Get the monologue here

Your Swash is Unbuckled by Jeff Goode
This piece is from the shorter play, “LEWD LOVES OF A LUSTY LAUNDRESS” within Your Swash is Unbuckled. MOLLY, a young laundress with two “manly” stepsisters and a “manly” stepmother, is repeatedly berated and teased by her step-family. She dreams of being whisked away by a handsome, strong, and/or wealthy man riding any kind of horse and going to any location other than where she currently is. In this scene, her step-sisters and step-mother have dropped more laundry on her and are forbidding her from going to the fair. The women leave, and as Molly goes through the laundry, she finds various shirts belonging to high-ranking individuals and fantasizes about who they belong to.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for Michael or John


“Sprouting Legs” by R.J. Ryland
This monologue is not from a play; it is a standalone piece. This scene entitled “Sprouting Legs.” A child stands on their bed in fear of the spider that has appeared in their room because of the heaping pile of garbage on the floor. The child is talking to the spider, telling it that it can’t just move on in. A good monologue for an actor exploring humor and situational comedy.

Get the monologue here

“Nora” by Douglas M. Parker
This kid is describing their sister Nora, and how she has two different personalities, Nice Nora and Nasty Nora. The kid never knows which side of Nora to expect! Maybe being an only child would be easier. A good piece for a young actor exploring contrasting emotions.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for Mrs. Darling


Mad Millie by Olivia Briggs
A darkly satirical one-woman play, “Mad Millie” features Mrs. Singleton, a self-professed perfect, American housewife with some pretty high ideals. Now imprisoned for the murder of a “rebellious” young woman who moved into her gated community, Mrs. Singleton spends her days recounting what she told the police on her final day of freedom. Fed up with the police officer’s accusations, Mrs. Singleton decides to let him have it.

Get the monologue here

Romance by Barbara Lhota
MIRIAM, 30s, a medieval literature professor reveals to a perfect stranger why she thinks her marriage is dead. In this piece, she imagines how her husband will react to her being missing and in doing so, tries to justify why she had to leave.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for Mr. Darling


Grover by Joel Fishbane
Wife has kicked out Husband, who’s crushed and now living with his older sister, Jess. Husband and Jess are currently gathering all of Husband’s things from the apartment he used to share with Wife. Husband is shocked that Wife has just gotten a new dog, considering the two of them initially bonded over their mutual hatred of dogs. Husband thinks the only explanation for her having a dog is that Wife is now living with a secret lover.

Get the monologue here

Catatonic by Rosary O’Neill
A short comedy, Mary and Tom, empty nesters at a country house in upstate New York, fuss over the welfare of their poodle to avoid talk of his heart surgery. Tom minimizes his poodle’s scalp haircut and his bad heart.

Get the monologue here

Auditioning for Tinkerbell


Your Swash is Unbuckled by Jeff Goode
This piece is from the shorter play, “MAIDS MADE MEN” within Your Swash is Unbuckled. A secluded wood. RENÉ, a female highwayman-in-men’s-clothing, bursts in, with sword drawn, and a moustache drawn on. She enters thinking she heard a lady speaking, and when she finds there is no one there, she breaks down and lists her woes. She, like Antoinette (another fleeing woman who is currently hiding in the trees nearby), has been seduced by her fencing master and led into a life of being a highway(wo)man. She bears her true clothing in a moment of relief while distraught, but must cover herself when she hears someone approaching.

Get the monologue here

“Pail of Water” by Douglas M. Parker
Jack [or Jill] has a bone to pick with the stigma over their story. They went to fetch a pail of water–so what if they didn’t succeed in that mission? They weren’t saving the world, and someone else probably fetched some water right after them. Maybe everyone should just move on. A good monologue for a young actor standing up for what they believe is right.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for The Lost Boys


“Broccoli” by Douglas M. Parker
This kid has a bone to pick… with broccoli. Not only is it gross and disgusting, it’s also ugly. Fries are golden, and that means they’re delicious, but broccoli? Never! A good piece for a young actor looking to play with strong emotions and understated comedy.

Get the monologue here

“Bugs” by Douglas M. Parker
This kid likes bugs, and is very eloquent at explaining all the reasons why it’s strange that other people don’t like bugs as much as they do. After all, bugs are related to lobsters, if you like your dog, why can’t you like a bug? This monologue is great for a young actor looking to work on contradictions.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for Captain Hook


The Firebird by Evan Guilford-Blake
This monologue is delivered when the young hero, the Duke, confronts The Lobster — the Ruler of the Great Blue Sea. The Lobster introduces himself with a Lewis Carroll-esque style poetic recitation of how he became Ruler of the Great Blue Sea.

Get the monologue here.  

Scary, Scary Night by E. Michael Lundsford
Derek grew up in a funeral home with kooky parents Jeremy and Formalda Hyde who, to his dismay, love working with dead bodies. His girlfriend, Prudence drags a reluctant Derek to the House of Masks & Magic in search of a Halloween costume where they encounter the sinister owner and part-time killer, Nussbaum. While eager assistant, Albert, is in the back room trying to find a way to dispose of his boss’s latest victim, Nussbaum discovers who took over his old family home where he “accidentally” blew up his parents 20 years earlier. Nussbaum decides the funeral home is the perfect place to dispose of the body and wreak revenge on the Hydes whom he blames for the loss of his childhood home. In this scene, Nussbaum is about to get his revenge, railing against a bound and gagged Derek.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for Mr. Smee


Scary, Scary Night by E. Michael Lundsford
Albert is left alone with his first corpse. Albert has taught his the trick of cutting the back of a corpse’s suit to make it easier to maneuver the body.

Get the monologue here

The Scream by DT Arcieri
Bob, described simply as “disheveled”, is reading Stephen King’s ‘The Shining’ for a few seconds and then develops a twitch which becomes progressively worse. He drops the book, holds his face like the character in Munch’s painting and then screams. In this monologue, he describes his condition and its possible stress-related causes.

Get the monologue here.

Auditioning for The Pirates


A Field of Daisies by Rebecca Ryland
Former big city dwellers, Tom Benedict and his wife, Jennifer, find themselves embattled in a conflict between themselves and their new life in the country.  Filled with symbolism and harsh reality, the play lays witness to the final days of their deteriorating relationship and the murder trial that follows. Local, next door neighbor Lester (45 – 65), spins a yarn about the goat he mistook for a ghost.

Get the monologue here

Canterbury Tales by Burton Bumgarner
Here, the Cook begins his tale, which happens to be a cooking show and not quite a tale of any sort, making “medieval meals in just 30 minutes.” After he has made a barnyard casserole (which is just things you would find on a farm whisked together in a bowl), Harry, the narrator, pulls him offstage. Chaucer then admits that he got 58 lines into his tale, and promptly quit writing the Cook’s tale.

Get the monologue here



Looking for more material? Check out our other stories below!


Ashleigh Gardner received her M.A. in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies (with concentrations in Contemporary Film, Psychoanalytic Theory, and Gender Studies) and her B.A. in English Literature (with concentrations in Early American Literature, Victorian & Gothic Literature, and Feminisms), both from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, a Shakespearean trained actor, a dramaturge, and a photographer.
Photo by Christopher Campbell on Unsplash