7 Monologues for Characters Who Have Theatre on the Brain

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

September 27, 2016

Looking for an original monologue for competition or an audition? We’ve got you covered! Below are 5 monologues for women and 5 monologues for men — all from characters who’ve got theatre on the brain. Choose from comedic, seriocomic, or dramatic monologues. Like one? Click on the link after the description!

A monologue from Broadway or Bust by Rosary O’Neill

(Female, Dramatic, Teens – 30s)
Susan is an actor with cancer. While standing in the middle of the audition room, she threatens to die if not cast. She has already gone on a tirade to the auditioner about why she deserves the role, but here she continues to pound her point home by revealing that her entire existence is ruled by her fear of dying, and that is the real reason why she must get this role: it’s her last chance to make something of herself before her cancer defeats her.

Get the monologue here.

The Calling by Jane Miller

(Female, Serio-Comic, Teens – 30s)
In this standalone monologue, Louise stands at a table with some of the most perfect cupcakes the audience has ever seen, a giftbox, and a syringe. While she is talking she opens the giftbox and prepares to put the cakes in. Over the course of her monologue, Louise doesn’t outright state, but merely suggests that she has “eliminated” other actresses in the industry so that she has less competition to deal with. Louise explains all of this matter-of-factly and without remorse. (*This monologue contains adult language and frank talk of sex.)

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Occupational Hazards by Mark McCarthy

(Female, Comedic, Teens – 20s)
Occupational Hazards is an evening of short plays and monologues centered around workplace issues. In this monologue, called “Less is Less,” Helen is an acting student trying to get something worthwhile out of a class. At first, she is confused about the acting teacher’s practices and reasoning. But then, she has a realization about her teacher’s technique, a technique she openly questions the validity of, and reveals a little something…personal…about herself. (*Contains adult themes.)

Get the monologue here.

My Nose Turns Red by R.J. Ryland

(Female, Dramatic, Juniors – 20s)
This standalone monologue is entitled “My Nose Turns Red.” A child, whose school brought in a clown to teach clowning, tries out balancing on a ball for the first time. The child has never been the center of attention, and when they are put in front of a crowd of peers, they are terrified. But as they balance on the ball, they find confidence and reassurance that this is where they belong. A great monologue for an actor exploring inspirational moments in a character’s life.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from New by Crystal Skillman

(Male, Comedic, Teens – 20s)
In this comedic, melodramatic monologue, Marcus, the lead in the high school play, has just reappeared from the school parking lot with an icepack on his head. He has not slept since the dress rehearsal the night before. He is dazed and slightly crazed after walking all night. Marcus is a student actor who is delving hard into the Stanislavsky method; his emotions are amplified by his sleeplessness and his statements are bold and extravagant. He philosophizes about his place in the world and how the theatre has changed his sense of self.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Broadway or Bust by Rosary O’Neill

(Male, Serio-Comic, Teens – 30s)
Comedy: two love struck actors audition for Broadway and are confronted with questions that are afraid to answer and routines that lead them into questioning their lives. In this monologue, Johnny attacks the auditioner for his invasiveness after the auditioner asks Johnny annoying questions and probes him about his hostile attitude. Johnny explains how hard auditioning has been for him: the rejection, the long nights rehearsing, the long days sitting at auditions, and the sneaky exits he’s made from waiting rooms after he’s fallen asleep.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Techies by Don Goodrum

(Male, Comedic, Teens)
High school student Charlie Porter is the fragile star of Jezebel’s Last Chance and has just found out that Bonnie, his long-time friend and co-star, is not going to make that night’s performance. To make things worse, she is being replaced by Camille Curry, an unforgiving actress who has no patience with Charlie’s sensitive nature. Charlie is in a serious panic, and he pleads with his friend and co-star, Anthony, to tell him what to do.

Get the monologue here.


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.