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10 New Monologues from Jonathan Dorf

Written by Ashleigh Gardner

June 23, 2017

Are you searching endlessly for a great monologue for audition or competition? Look no further! We’ve compiled a list of ten new monologues from Jonathan Dorf. These are sure to blow the auditors away!

A monologue from War of the Buttons

(Male, Juniors – Teens, Dramatic/Serio-comic)
Ticker, 12, a hyperactive imp who has just gotten into a fight with some students from the nearby prep school, talks to Charlie, 15. Charlie’s parents have left him—and it’s starting to look as if it’s for good. They’re on a sidewalk, where Charlie sits with his family’s luggage.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Rumors of Polar Bears

(Male, Teens, Dramatic)
Romulus, 15, one of several teens surviving in the aftermath of a climate induced catastrophe, keeps watch as the others settle down to sleep. Once he’s sure they’re asleep, he pulls out a ratty book.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Locker Next 2 Mine

(Male, Teens, Dramatic)
Legolas, a sensitive Goth teen, is in a classroom where they’ve just received the results of aptitude tests that they took earlier in the year.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Last Right Before the Void

(Male, Teens, Dramatic)
Christian, 17, hitchhiking on a deserted highway, talks to a woman who hitchhikes on the other side of the road and carries a sign that says “Alaska.”

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Dear Chuck

(Male or Female, Teen, Dramatic)
This character sits in a church at a funeral for one of their classmates.  All of the other kids from school are there, while his/her mom sits in the back of the church, waiting until it’s over to take him/her home.  In this inner monologue, this teen tries to make sense of the suicide that happened, observing the service; one classmate can’t make it through singing Amazing Grace in the choir.  In an age of trying to find out who we are (what our “Chuck” is), this teen is caught up in the greatest unknown—death.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from The Locker Next 2 Mine

(Female, Teens, Dramatic)
Luna, a teenager, stands alone on stage and speaks about the authentication of the planet Pluto.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Dear Chuck

(Female, Teens, Dramatic)
In this monologue, a teen girl addresses the audience.  She talks candidly about a new car, and a new dress and diamond ring she is just given by her father, no strings attached.  However, there is a hidden guilt to these gifts that would otherwise make her seem so wealthy.  She contemplates giving up the ring so that she can buy lunch; maybe her mother could quit one of her jobs so that they might just get ahead for a minute.  Why should she have such a nice dress, shouldn’t her mom have one too? It is hard to keep up appearances at school and tell the world everything is fine, when maybe at home, everything else is in complete disarray.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from 4 AM

(Female, Teens, Comedic)
Teenaged Frankie, a short-wave radio DJ, broadcasts from her bedroom. She has no idea whether her show has any listeners at all.

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Dear Chuck

(Male or Female, Teen, Dramatic)
In this monologue, a teen (girl or boy) is writing a letter to their “Chuck.” Chuck is the person we are aspiring to be, that elusive ‘true self’ that we think we know as a child, but becomes harder and harder to grasp through our adolescence.  He/she writes to this intangible “Chuck,” wondering where they have gone, and what it is like out “there,” wherever “there” might be.  This monologue is almost as if the character is talking to their future self, wondering what they will be like, what they will become, and will they even recognize themselves when they get there?

Get the monologue here.

A monologue from Dear Chuck

(Female, Teens, Dramatic)
This character comes back time and again in the play with different protest signs.  One says “save the whales,” another “feed the hungry;” she is always making a stand for a cause.  In this monologue, she tells a story of how she went to sign a petition for a man who always stands outside the post office and has a table set up for different causes.  However, she is denied a signature because she is not a registered voter.   She wonders why she can’t work for her own causes at her age.  All she wants is her voice to be heard.

Get the monologue here.



Looking for other monologue collections? Check out the ones below!


Ashleigh Gardner received her AA in Theatre/Drama/Dramatic Arts from Valencia College and her Bachelors Degree in English Literature and Masters Degree in Literary, Cultural, and Textual Studies from the University of Central Florida. She is a playwright, an actor, and PerformerStuff.com’s Editor.